Are broken fingernails telling us something? Modern science has recently observed how the lines on our hands connect to the nervous structure of our brains. A nail protects our finger. A question to ask when a fingernail breaks may be: What protective mechanisms in thought...

According to Emory University neuroscientist Charles Raison, MD, in a review article in the December 2010 issue of Archives of General Psychiatry; there is mounting evidence that our lack of contact with microorganisms in the soil, food and gut, due to our excessive cleanliness, may...

Oreo cookies were born in New York City in 1912 when a few bakeries combined to form the National Biscuit Company (Nabisco) and opened a factory in the Chelsea Market building on 9th Avenue between 15th and 16th St -now called "Oreo Way." The first prototype...

Is that man good husband material or that woman hot? It may not be facts that are guiding our judgments and decisions, but a reaction to whether an opinion of that potential partner is given a positive or negative spin or not. The "framing effect" is...

According to a recent study by UCLA psychologists, looking at a photo, holding the hand or even just thinking of a loved one will reduce pain. The study which appeared in the November 2009 issue of the Journal Psychological Science, involved 25 women who received a...

According to a Virginia Commonwealth University study, having a dog at work not only reduces the owners stress level but also increased the level of job satisfaction for other employees as well.In the past 20 years, many studies have looked at the relationship between job...

A recent study published in the Journal of Neuroscience by authors Peggy Mason, PhD, professor of neurobiology, and Hayley Foo, PhD, research associate professor of neurobiology at the University of Chicago, is the first to show that while ingesting food or drink, a powerful painkilling...

Generosity and trustworthiness may go hand in hand. Researchers at Oxford University set out to discover the signals we rely on to decide who we can trust. What they found was that we distrust people who are stingy with their money and it turns out...

Daniel Goleman, PhD, is a psychologist and former science journalist at the New York Times and best-selling author of Emotional Intelligence, Social Intelligence, and most recently, Ecological Intelligence. Goleman supports the concept that conventional intelligence measured by one's IQ isn't necessarily a measure of how...

In a study from Loma Linda University Health, presented at the Experimental Biology conference meetings in San Diego, joyful or mirthful laughter was shown to produce brain wave frequencies similar to those seen among people who reach what is considered the desired "true state of...

In 2001, a major cell phone company BT Cellnet commissioned researchers at a UK social research centre (SIRC), to verify if gossip was good for one's health. If gossip was good for you, then SMS messages, Twittering and talking with friends on our cell phone,...

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column][vc_column_text]According to a report in today's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center found that training in mindfulness meditation and communication alleviated psychological distress and burnout experienced...